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Willow Springs Crown Vic & S2000

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  • #16
    by all accounts Ford's 4.6 2v engines are among the more durable of all production engines ever..

    “We need a commercial-grade, fleet-grade, purpose-built vehicle. It took 20 years and $50 million to perfect the Crown Vic. You can’t just paint any passenger car yellow and put it on the road. It has to be taxi tough.”


    Taxi Tough: A Look Inside an NYC Cab Shop – Feature – Car and Driver

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    • #17
      Often times stuff that's cool isn't all that practical. (italian cars, english cars, rotaries, etc) This is one of those cases.

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      • #18
        you're certainly not going to find many off the shelf performance parts for them but you can drive the piss out of them as is and they and they perform pretty good for what they are.. now I'm curious what kind of lap times you could do in one that's stock..

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        • #19
          Originally posted by robburgoon View Post
          Often times stuff that's cool isn't all that practical. (italian cars, english cars, rotaries, etc) This is one of those cases.
          I've always wondered what it is about Italian cars, or British cars, or German cars. What makes one country better than the other at engineering feats in a world connected by globalization, where anyone can go to school anywhere? Is German engineering really superior? Or is that fan boi bull**** perpetuated over time? Are British and Italian cars still ticking time bombs,or is that an outdated generalization? I find those truisms hard to believe in a world where Ford is making cars I'd like to buy, and Chevy is selling the best performance-value car in the history of... ever.
          2001 MR2-Eleven
          Experience Points: 21
          Youtube Channel.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by SDSUsnowboards View Post
            I've always wondered what it is about Italian cars, or British cars, or German cars. What makes one country better than the other at engineering feats in a world connected by globalization, where anyone can go to school anywhere? Is German engineering really superior? Or is that fan boi bull**** perpetuated over time? Are British and Italian cars still ticking time bombs,or is that an outdated generalization? I find those truisms hard to believe in a world where Ford is making cars I'd like to buy, and Chevy is selling the best performance-value car in the history of... ever.
            Work culture is a big deal. Japanese take work seriously, the english workers built the cars wrong on purpose to stick it to the man, and the italians still haven't figured out what this whole work thing is.

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            • #21
              S2000 vid:

              https://youtu.be/RdhJoe3XvZM

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              • #22
                Originally posted by robburgoon View Post
                Work culture is a big deal.
                This. Whether you are talking about a 3 person company or a country or millions, this makes a huge difference in the type and quality of product you produce.
                2002 Porsche 911 Targa
                1967 GTV
                1991 Mazda SuperMiata - Junior
                2008 350z - Sold

                FastInFastOut.com

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                • #23
                  If nothing else. It does look like a lot of fun driving a pig car!
                  That's not a Typo, I just can't spell no so well.

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                  • #24
                    Good on you, Drew. It's a unique car, for sure. I suggest a squawker in the grille just to remind people who won't let you by that you are there, plus it would twist some brains to see a p71 in your mirrors at the track squawking like it is pulling you over.

                    Regarding the engineering of different cultures, that is the whole gestalt of the different makes. A lot of it IS advertising BS, but if you work on your own cars, you can start to understand the philosophies each manufacturer employs. When I work on my German cars, versus my Japanese cars, there is a different logic to the way the car is built. Understanding the logic makes repairs simpler, in my humble opinion.

                    People will say this or that country is superior in their engineering, it's really about execution. Some manufacturers execute and play to their strengths better than others.
                    Yer pal,
                    Force

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Force McCocken View Post
                      Good on you, Drew. It's a unique car, for sure. I suggest a squawker in the grille just to remind people who won't let you by that you are there, plus it would twist some brains to see a p71 in your mirrors at the track squawking like it is pulling you over.

                      Regarding the engineering of different cultures, that is the whole gestalt of the different makes. A lot of it IS advertising BS, but if you work on your own cars, you can start to understand the philosophies each manufacturer employs. When I work on my German cars, versus my Japanese cars, there is a different logic to the way the car is built. Understanding the logic makes repairs simpler, in my humble opinion.

                      People will say this or that country is superior in their engineering, it's really about execution. Some manufacturers execute and play to their strengths better than others.
                      I really enjoy working on my brother's BMW Z3. For the most part, it's highly serviceable--followed very closely by the 2003 Ford Focus. Toyota made some interesting choices with the 4 runner which makes it difficult to service. The MR2 isn't too bad, especially for a mid-engine. The worst car I've ever worked on was my Miata. I have no idea what Mazda was thinking. TBH, I hate working on Japanese cars. You have to be a contortionist. And fragile plastic clips everywhere.
                      2001 MR2-Eleven
                      Experience Points: 21
                      Youtube Channel.

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                      • #26
                        There are so may ways to build a car.
                        That's not a Typo, I just can't spell no so well.

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