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Wideband 02 sensor wired to OBD I ECM

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  • Wideband 02 sensor wired to OBD I ECM

    I'm getting ready to add the wideband o2 sensor and adjustable fuel pressure regulator on my Spec Miata. I understand there is a way to use the wideband o2 sensor to feed info to the OBD I ECM in my car.

    Why do that, right?

    That way, I wouldn't have to weld in a second bung. and I could use the existing o2 location to provide input to two systems.

    The rub is that I don't know how to do it. Does anyone here know how or know someone in SoCal who does?
    www.TrackHQ.com

  • #2
    Not legal.

    Comment


    • #3
      The wideband needs a special control circuit.It is so precise because a constant temperature is kept at the measuring chamber.And it has different output signal from the narrow band O2 sensor.You need to buy a complete wideband system,with or without a gauge(like Zeitronix,AEM,etc) which has the control circuit built in,and has a conditioned output signal that resembles the narrow band O2 signal and may be fed directly into the ECU.
      But Rob says it is not legal..........

      Comment


      • #4
        The Innovate LC-1 I used in my '92 Miata has two output wires. One to the gauge, one for the ECU. I connected one wire it to the ECU wire that monitors the stock, NB O2 sensor. So, that WBO2 had a plugin connection that allowed me to connect to my laptop. Using the provided software, I could set the WB to narrow band settings. The stock ECU cannot understand the WB output, only NB. The car will run, but it will bog and just go a little nuts.

        When I would swap in my Megasquirt, I would connect back to the O2 sensor and change the settings back to wideband, then connect to the megasquirt and make the appropriate settings to match. I did this so I could swap back to 'stock' for California inspection and smog.
        Yer pal,
        Force

        Comment


        • #5
          What Force said. Find out what the voltage range is for the stock narrow band sensor and configure your wideband output to match it.

          I also recommend the NGK AFX over the Innovate or any Bosch based setup. Maybe it's a rotary thing, but those Bosch sensors have not lasted very long at all for me.

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          • #6
            Innovate is POS,may need frequent resets.May be a coincidence,but my Bosch sensors dint last with the Innovate.I use AEM gauge with built in control circuit now and my last sensor lasted more than year and a half.It is not a very friendly environment down there,a lot of moisture at start ups and over 1500 degrees on the straights

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            • #7
              +1, got sick of my flaky LC-1 a long, long time ago. Switched to an AEM.
              Theseus: '94 Miata, NASA SU/TTU (in progress)
              Rover: '90 Miata, NASA PTE/E3

              Comment


              • #8
                This thing has survived many years of abuse on one sensor. My tuner uses it, and he is primarily tuning rotaries which have 1600*+ EGT's. Replacement sensors are cheap too.

                NGK Performance Products - Powerdex AFX

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bawareca View Post
                  It is not a very friendly environment down there,a lot of moisture at start ups and over 1500 degrees on the straights
                  Ew. I hope you are talking about your engine bay and not your shorts.
                  Yer pal,
                  Force

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hakeem View Post
                    ........ rotaries which have 1600*+ EGT's. [/url]
                    Before or after the kabooom

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Force McCocken View Post
                      The Innovate LC-1 I used in my '92 Miata has two output wires. One to the gauge, one for the ECU. I connected one wire it to the ECU wire that monitors the stock, NB O2 sensor. So, that WBO2 had a plugin connection that allowed me to connect to my laptop. Using the provided software, I could set the WB to narrow band settings. The stock ECU cannot understand the WB output, only NB. The car will run, but it will bog and just go a little nuts.

                      When I would swap in my Megasquirt, I would connect back to the O2 sensor and change the settings back to wideband, then connect to the megasquirt and make the appropriate settings to match. I did this so I could swap back to 'stock' for California inspection and smog.
                      I read this three times. Still ...

                      I've got an AEM kit on the way. I'll add another bung to avoid Rob's protests.
                      www.TrackHQ.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ucfbrett View Post
                        I read this three times. Still ...

                        I've got an AEM kit on the way. I'll add another bung to avoid Rob's protests.
                        That would be the best way to avoid complications and protests.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ucfbrett View Post
                          I read this three times. Still ...

                          I've got an AEM kit on the way. I'll add another bung to avoid Rob's protests.
                          Your stock ECU reads voltage from the OEM narrowband O2 sensor and converts it to an AFR or lambda value. For example, maybe it's 0-5v which would correlate to 10-20:1 AFR. Once you know what those values are that your ECU is expecting, you can program your new O2 sensor controller to output the correct voltage so that the ECU can read it correctly.

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                          • #14
                            Narrowband sensors output 0-1 V signal,that is what the ECU expects.

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                            • #15
                              Tis true though, you would probably be fine until you hit the money at Miller.

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