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Racing around the rules

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  • Racing around the rules

    Creative interpretations and just plain cheating.

    From the Amelia Island concours in March


    WWW.949RACING.COM
    SuperMiata

    Aside from their cost I never understood why people race them.
    But obviously I just dont get it. -fatbillybob

  • #2
    cool story! I like the sliding restrictor plate

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    • #3
      Last year at the NASA Championships, one of the Spec Miatas had a restrictor plate that had the appropriate size hole, but it was offset compared with the plates sold by SCCA Enterprises. The offset created better airflow and presumably made more power. Spec plates were required after that, but we found another one this year.
      www.TrackHQ.com

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      • #4
        At 11:05 Mark Raffauf said they put dry ice in the roof-mounted air intakes, but dry ice is carbon dioxide. Wouldn't all that evaporated carbon dioxide diminish the amount of oxygen going to the engine and decrease performance?
        www.TrackHQ.com

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        • #5
          It was funny at SCCA Daytona Runoffs a few years ago they disqualified the top 5 cars and #6 was the 1st legal car!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ucfbrett View Post
            At 11:05 Mark Raffauf said they put dry ice in the roof-mounted air intakes, but dry ice is carbon dioxide. Wouldn't all that evaporated carbon dioxide diminish the amount of oxygen going to the engine and decrease performance?
            Might depend on how bad your detonation problem is. If you gain power from more timing/boost faster than you replace oxygen, you're in business.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ucfbrett View Post
              At 11:05 Mark Raffauf said they put dry ice in the roof-mounted air intakes, but dry ice is carbon dioxide. Wouldn't all that evaporated carbon dioxide diminish the amount of oxygen going to the engine and decrease performance?
              I don't think that intake is actually into the engine. When I have seen this done, and I have witnessed it first hand, they are packing dry ice around the intercoolers or into the ducts feeding the intercoolers.
              To the right of The Sheriff. Isn't everyone?

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              • #8
                Smokey Yunick, a renowned NASCAR builder in the '60's and Popular Mechanic's columnist, was the ace cheat.
                Yunick was perhaps best known for interpreting what the rule book said—or, perhaps, didn't say. For example: In 1968, he said NASCAR specified how big a fuel tank could be, but he noticed no one said how big the fuel line could be. Instead of a half-inch fuel line, Yunick created a two-inch fuel line that was 11 feet long, and held held five gallons of gas. Cheating? Not really, since nowhere did it say you couldn't do that.

                As you can see, Smokey liked having lots of fuel; and a similar Smokey Cheat just happens to be the no. 1 Jalopnik Cheat.
                By installing a basketball — yes, a basketball — inside the fuel tank of his race car, Smokey Yunick’s car was able to pass tech inspection with an oversized and out-of-regulation fuel tank. After tech inspection, Yunick and his team would deflate the ball, allowing them a fuel capacity advantage throughout the race.

                Here's a great summary of good ole American ingenuity - Nascar style:

                https://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-drive/culture/commuting/nascars-golden-age-of-cheating/article4178760/


                Last edited by Loose Caboose; 10-05-2019, 12:27 AM.

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                • #9
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	514e6gBPYiL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg Views:	1 Size:	24.7 KB ID:	263070

                  My wife bought this book for me years ago and I devoured it. It's hugely interesting and entertaining and libelous in places.

                  I went up to Ormond Beach, Fla., and peered in the windows of his shop just before they tore it down to put up condos. I got to meet him just before he died when he donated his Smoketron engine-spin tool to UCF. He had become friends with one of the engineering professors who built a race engine optimization program at UCF.

                  I ended up writing a feature for Racecar Engineering magazine about the program and the donated Smoketron. Smokey was one of a kind.
                  www.TrackHQ.com

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                  • #10
                    Wow! Such a great story . . .

                    For those who are curious, here's a collection of links about this amazing guy.

                    https://www.bing.com/search?q=smokey...68D656D9BCE9DD
                    Last edited by Loose Caboose; 10-06-2019, 01:15 AM.

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                    • #11
                      www.TrackHQ.com

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